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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> is congress going insane? lawmakers said to be crafting another $100 billion in stimulus even though america's economy has lost 3 million jobs since the first stimulus having some folks remind us insanity snow so is doing more intimidate will you explain to welcome to "forbes on fox." let's go in focus with steve forbes. by the way how capitalism will save us is literally flying off book shels everywhere. also joining us our panel. david: so is this insane? >> david, it's clinically insane. now you can understand the process that leads to thcht the democrats are now here's the anyone an 12k4i -- part of this is capital constraint. but when i go around the country to talk to small business peep, they are playing defence because they are worried about health care, cap and trade and forced unionization. so the irony, the inst. san to the best of my recollection you are purviewing they were he comes to a burning house and throws water on the house and see the house was charred and say gee it's not going to work. but right now there's no one else spending. i think we do zpwhove -- we do need a s
and it ends today. the commissioning ceremony of the u.s.s. new york. welcome to a special edition of "america's news h.q.." jamie: this is a very special hour. did you know the bow on the navy's newest warship was forged from steel that once held up the world trade center? the u.s.s. new york will be commissioned into active military service in a ceremon -- ceremony on a manhattan pier. inspiration found on one of america's darkest days, september 11, 2001. nearly 3,000 americans killed when terrorists crashed airliners into the twin towers. some 7.5 tons of the steel that held up those towers preserved, built into a $1 billion warship, forged at a shipyard outside new orleans. now the u.s.s. new york comes full circle. laura engle is lucky enough to be live on pier 86 in new york city, where the commissioning will begin at any moment. laura, there must be so much excitement there. not only is she a beautiful vessel, she also has incredible capability. >> that's right. that's what everybody here has been talking about, jamie. just the sheer size that we have been marveling at all week long si
? >> up next. the eye popping higher cost of education. some say there's one czar america needs and he's not pictured here and the stocks to help you pay for or >> a new report out this week showing 58 universities now charging more than $50,000 a year and that's why mike says, america needs a tuition czar, mike? >> don't succumb to czar-noia. >> a higher education is absolutely essential to competing in the global market place. if we have someone looking into green energy, we should have someone looking into making sure that american high school students can afford a college education. >> it's iron ig, two people with no children here, evelyn, what do you think? >> 58 colleges might require $50,000 or more a year. vast majority charge less than that. if you don't want to pay more than $50,000, don't. go to a different college. the declaration of independent doesn't go the life, liberty and pursuant of harvard. >> czar-noia, not as many czars as obama. nobody wants to go through the confirmation process. that may be a couple hundred thousand kids and hope they enjoy themselves at the
within just hours. the promise? it's going to improve health care in america. but the forbes team found something tucked inside they say will lead to more rationing. who's right? hi, everybody. i'm david asman. welcome to "forbes on fox." steve forbes, elizabeth mcdonald and neil weinberg. steve, you're concerned about a little commission that's hidden in this. which one? >> it's about payments for a costly procedure, another form of rationing. they have this in england, a thing called nice, national institute for clinical and health incidents. david: an ironic being a crow him in. -- acronym. >> the state of washington has something similar. but they banned things like scoping your knees for arthritis, m.r.i.'s for breast cancer and things like that. so government can restrict health care supply, ration it, but it can't increase the supply. david: and neil, they do it in england so probably they'll do it here if we get national health care. >> i can't help but notice that the people harging most for the scare tactic that rationing will get between you and your doctor, these evil bureau
out all these plans. >> i would just point out that america's health insurance plans, the big lobby group, is behind this, so the health insurers, they horse traded. they got what they wanted out of this bill. shouldn't we -- david: i don't know if they got what they wanted, but it's true they did think they were going get something out of t. >> if they did have to give a little, they're getting some. just like the health insurers. david: but victoria, the question, is do you really think the unions would go that much in favor of something that hurts them? >> i don't think in the end this bill -- them don't see it as hurting them. certainly they've gotten a lot of deals out of it. and my question, is what about the taxpayers? it's like everyone has a lobbying group in washington except for taxpayers. david: e-mac, quickly, go ahead. >> how come no one's talking about the $10 billion that could go to unionized companies to dwhray retiree healthcare costs? that could come again in the dead of night on christmas event it's already been in one of the bills. it could come. our tax dollar
of america has a balance sheet that's 10 times the size of exxonmobil, and if they could manage it on their own addition it's not humanly possible for anybody to manage that saysed 2 trillion balance sheet. the issue is get the government regulators to step in sooner. a. gifment could have been sued by the office of supervision, but they had macaroni noodles or backbones down there. have a bigger cushion to stop the problem, not these big ones that are filled with it. >> that's what i'm saying, much bigger, not a little bit bigger, but much bigger. david: e. mac is always bringing up the point that these banks are too big, they need to be broken up. some banks are just too big and need to be broken up. >> well, that again, one gets to capital requirements, but this, too, gets to a matter of timing. this is not the time to be putting new capital requirements on banks where when they should be out there lending instead of saying we got to hoard capital and starve the economy. that's part of the problem with politics. when times are good, they don't build up the capital. when times
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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